Tracking Service-Oriented and Web-Oriented Architecture

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At its core DevOps is all about collaboration. The lines of communication must be opened and it takes some effort to ensure that they stay that way. It's easy to pay lip service to trends and talk about implementing new methodologies, but without action, real benefits cannot be realized. Success requires planning, advocates empowered to effect change, and, of course, the right tooling. To bring about a cultural shift it's important to share challenges. In simple terms, ensuring that everyone knows what everyone else is doing can create a real team spirit and social cohesion that will drive DevOps forward. Here are six tips that can be implemented to help you get there. 1. Stand-ups A daily team meeting where people get an opportunity to review their progress by addressing three simple questions: What did I do yesterday? What will I do today? What might block me fro... (more)

The #IoT and #DNS | @ExpoDX #BigData #AI #IIoT #DigitalTransformation

JANUARY 8, 2014 02:00 PM EST When we talk about the impact of BYOD and BYOA and the Internet of Things, we often focus on the impact on data center architectures. That's because there will be an increasing need for authentication, for access control, for security, for application delivery as the number of potential endpoints (clients, devices, things) increases. That means scale in the data center. What we gloss over, what we skip, is that before any of these "things" ever makes a request to access an application it had to execute a DNS query. Every. Single. Thing. Maybe that's because we assume DNS can handle the load. So far it's done well. You rarely, if ever, hear of disruptions or outages due directly to the execution of DNS. Oh, there has been some issues with misconfiguration of DNS and of exploitation of DNS (hijacking, illicit use in reflection attacks, et... (more)

Lenovo Introduces an ‘Interpersonal Computer’

Remember Microsoft's Surface? Well, Lenovo's got this thing called the IdeaCentre Horizon Table PC that it's touting as the first "interpersonal computer." It's a Window 8 dingus with a 27-inch screen that can be laid down or stood up so four people can use it all at once as though it was a big board game, which went fitted out with paddles and joysticks appears to be its main purpose. Surface, now called PixelSense, was designed for store displays and other commercial applications. The Table PC's screen, which is the size of eight iPads sewn together, is said to respond to 10 fingers touching it at the same time. Photos and videos can be rotated. It weighs 15lbs and will cost $1,699 this summer when it goes on sale. ... (more)

You Only Control One-Third of Your Page Load Performance!

You don't agree with that? Have you ever looked at the details of your page load time and analyzed what really impacts Page Load Time? Let me show you with a real life example and let me explain that in most cases you only control 1/3 of the time required to load a page as the rest is consumed by third-party content that you do not have under control. Be Aware of Third-Party Content When analyzing web page load times we can use tools such as dynaTrace, Firebug or PageSpeed. The following two screenshots show timeline views from dynaTrace AJAX Edition. The timelines show all network downloads, rendering activities and JavaScript executions that happen when loading almost exactly the same page. The question is: Where does the huge difference come from? Timeline of web page with and without third-party content showing a difference of 8 seconds in total page load time ... (more)

Factory Design Pattern - An Effective Approach

As you know the Factory Method Pattern or popularly known as the Factory Design Pattern is one the design patterns under the category of "Creational Design Pattern". The basic principle behind the pattern is that at runtime we get an object of similar type based on the parameter we pass. There are many articles on this pattern and developers implement in various ways to achieve it. In this article I will show you how to create a better and most effective way of designing factory design pattern. Technicalities As I have told you we will get a similar type object at run-time in the case of a factory design so that the underlying implementation of an object will be behind the screen. Let us consider a simple approach. Let's consider a Person object that can be either Male or Female. At runtime we should only consider the behavior of the person but not the gender. As the... (more)

RIA Themes & Topics at AJAXWorld 2008 East: Complete Round-Up

A round-up of the overall themes and topics being presented at AJAXWorld 2008 East at The Roosevelt Hotel in midtown Manhattan, March 18-20, 2008 - including Enterprise Mashups, Rich Internet Applications, Security, Enterprise AJAX, Silverlight, GWT, Reverse AJAX/'AJAX Push', AIR/Flash/Flex, JavaFX, ASP.NET AJAX, Seam, JSF, iPhone, Social Applications, YUI, jMaki, Appcelerator, Curl and more... The business value of RIAs is very clear: aesthetics do matter and users would like a pleasant experience. Good RIAs can provide your customers with user experiences that leave your competition in the dust. While most enterprise applications are based on old client/server technology with high cost of ownership and lack of flexibility, switching to the Web as a platform for mission-critical applications is very appealing – as it lowers the TCO significantly. With a lineu... (more)

ESB Pattern: What Is the ESB?

ESB products emerged around 2002 from message-oriented middleware (MOM). Faced with market domination by IBM, MOM vendors were the first to jumpstart the ESB concept with the aim of developing a unique selling proposition. They added Web service and EAI capabilities on top of existing message broker capabilities, and with analyst support coined the term ESB. ESB was positioned as a low-cost alternative to EAI and panacea for all integration needs - tell-tale signs of hype. Unfortunately, the standards community was too late to get on the bandwagon. In the absence of standards guidance and the lack of a clear definition, each vendor interpreted ESB to its advantage. As a result, comparing ESBs is like comparing apples and oranges. No two products are compatible today with severe consequences (in terms of vendor lock-in) for end users. SCA promises alleviation here, a... (more)

Column Store, In-Memory, MPP Databases and Oracle

( For latest information on Oracle 12c database update please refer to the following article: Oracle 12c Database and How It Relates to SAP Hana ) RDBMSs are stable and mature products. While there is nothing radically new on horizon that would challenge Codd's relational theory and related advances in data processing there are some developments that force established vendors like Oracle to come up with new features and products. Column Stores and Oracle Column store concept has been around for quite a while. Vendors like HP Vertica grabbed some market share in data warehousing segment with their column store,  MPP databases. Oracle Exadata is offering Hybrid Columnar Compression -  solution that modifies Oracle standard row based storage (NSM, or row-major) into proprietary format that is probably closer to PAX (as opposed to DSM) classification. Rows of data are reo... (more)

Demystifying the ESB

Like pretty much everything that gets caught up in the IT hype cycle, the enterprise service bus (ESB) has taken on mythic capabilities. And, like pretty much everything that becomes the focus of myth, there's a kernel of truth embedded within all those super powers. To begin the process of separating fact from fiction, let's start with a workable definition of an ESB. "An enterprise service bus is an integration platform that utilizes Web service standards to support a wide variety of communications patterns over multiple transport protocols and deliver value-added capabilities. Now, let's pick that apart a bit so we can better understand just what an ESB can really do. 1. An ESB is an integration platform... While an ESB can be used to build a standalone application "from scratch," it's not ideal for that purpose. The main competition here is the various componen... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Is Web 2.0 the Global SOA?

The subject of Web 2.0 has become profoundly important over the last year. Web 2.0 describes the next generation of the Web as an application platform where most of a user's software experience resides. The subject is somewhat controversial, but it's becoming ever more apparent as the successor to monolithic system architecture, prepackaged software, and traditional Web applications. Software as a Service (SAAS) and Web as Platform are only two of the larger mantras of Web 2.0 that most of the major software vendors have begun to embrace recently. Yet not only is Web 2.0 still very misunderstood, it's actually part of an even larger way of thinking about software in a fully service-oriented manner. This includes building composite applications, remixing data, building ad hoc supply chains, harnessing user involvement, aggregating knowledge, and more. Web 2.0 is bec... (more)

Will "Mobile AJAX" Dominate Web 2.0?

In this article, which focuses on the impact of Ajax on mobile application development only (i.e. he does not discuss Ajax in general), SOA Web Services Edge speaker Ajit Jaokar contends that - since his e-mail, calendar and other applications are on the web, and he can store all my documents on the web, all he needs is a browser. "One client to rule them all! Thus, today I would use a ‘browser-only PC’," he adds. Earlier this year, I published an article called AJAX for Mobile Devices Will Be the Hallmark of "Mobile Web 2.0" in 2006. It created quite a stir .. and I am thankful for all the feedback. Specifically, I would like to thank C Enrique Oritiz , Thomas Landspurg , Paul Golding and Jan Standal (Opera) for their feedback. Special thanks go to Paul Golding for brainstorming some of the ideas in this article with me. I did not intend to write a follo... (more)